A lot can be said about moxie's web3 post.

I'd like to consider just one sentence here.

"People don’t want to run their own servers, and never will."

First part is true. But why?

Even my grandma can install android apps. Apps have become so easy because big tech pushed for it to be. Big tech never developed the concept of set-top box-like homeservers, not in their interest. If pushed like apps, homeservers would be easy too!

People don't want to? They never were given a proper chance to!

Ergo, if development effort was put into making homeservers as easy to set up as a set-top box, people maybe would run their own servers.

So they never will? If we push for sane decentralization with solid tech for at home, they might just in the future.

@yarmo I’ve often pictured people using a raspberry pi in home with their own services. Unfortunately there is a lot to over come. Ignoring the Limitations of pi and setting up software. Let’s pretend that’s fully solved.

The part that’s hard is making it just “work” if they decide to leave the house still be able to access their stuff.

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@geekgonecrazy oh yes, there's a lot to overcome. My server likes to crash when I leave.

But that's the thing: I can install apps with a single button on my phone. All the stuff that happens behind the scenes: the builds, the dependencies, the versioning, the delta updates. So much automation to allow the one click process.

(Oversimplification)

Surely, if as much care was put into homeservers, there'd be little we couldn't solve: DNS, network, backups, server restarts

(Conjecture galore :/)

@yarmo this is certainly true! If we wanted it bad enough it could be so. Site.js and YUNOHOST are a couple of great projects in that direction. Maybe embracing something like WireGuard would have with that sort of connection back

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