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Discussions on which programming language is the best compares to discussing whether a hammer or a screwdriver is the better tool.

@rudolf

> Discussions on which programming language is the best compares to discussing whether a hammer or a screwdriver is the better tool.

Definitely the screwdriver. You can bang on a nail with pretty much anything, and it'll go in if you hit it hard enough. But a screwdriver in the _only_ way to fasten screws. And have you seen the modern word? Screws _everywhere_, pretty much since Archimedes

Related: shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtal

@rudolf Except that some tools no one in their right mind would ever subject themselves to using.. C# would be like using a screwdriver covered in fire ants where the head doesn't seem to match any screws except this one especially screw made out of a candle wax.

Did I mention you are allergic to fire ants?

@rudolf Of course it's the screwdriver. We choose to get hammered but we're all getting screwed whether we like it or not

@rudolf the best programming language is the one you know.

@rudolf I would compare it to arguing over whether English or Japanese is a better language.

All full programming languages are Turing complete, so they can do anything in theory.

You can also create alternative compilers/toolchains, so that you could, for instance, create a kernel in Java. Something that would be impossible using the standard toolchain.

Where they differ is how easy or hard it is to express certain things.

@urusan
I can program C and Cobol. I wouldn't even imagine writing Unix in Cobol, neither would I imagine writing a Point of Sales application in C.
Else I would be sitting on a roof, with a bucket full of nails and a screwdriver :)

@rudolf Wait, what would you write a point of sale application in?

A quick Google search suggests it's one of the most popular languages for that application, but I'm not familiar with the field myself.

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