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The time has finally come to rethink how I deploy my personal website. For the last 3 years I've been using homebase and pushing changes to it via dat protocol. It worked great, but things at the dat project have moved on, and deploys are no longer reliable.

Do I try to upgrade to hyper protocol, or ipfs? Maybe something more traditional like a git based deploy? Or just go for dead simple like rsync?

Decisions, decisions...

Wound up standing up a simple Caddy webserver, and using rsync to deploy. Simple enough.

Thanks @YellowGrue and @hopeless for talking sense. Already feeling better about it.

@rho git and rsync are going to continue to work over ssh forever, without bringing in dependencies on p2p participants.

@hopeless Very true. I'm inclined to go that way. Though it's hard for me to resist experimenting with newer strategies.

@rho git-annex is worth a look in because it effectively has the syncing built in and allows you to version control the metadata for binary files and transfer them around between remotes which I've found pretty handy for assets in the past.

It's a weird paradigm but I use it for so many things because it solves problems in a way that's very compatible with my workflow, so it's not a strong endorsement so much as a "have a look it might solve your problem".

@rho
As the years pass I find I want to have things work forever rather than have to update them. So I would recommend rsync; you will never have to worry about this situation again and can focus on other projects.

@YellowGrue Solid point. This all started as a way to better understand Dat. I could just as easily do that for the Next Cool Thing™ with a small demo project, rather than something I'll be maintaining for years.

@xyhhx I really like it. If you only need a simple webserver or proxy, it makes things really fast and easy.

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