Follow

"Just because there is now a multi-billion-dollar industry based on the abject betrayal of our privacy doesn’t mean the sociopaths who built it have any right whatsoever to continue getting away with it"

Great post!

daringfireball.net/2020/09/onl

OCR Output (chars: 1182) 

@sorin
Consider the new ad-tracking privacy protection feature in iOS 14.
The tracking industry, led by Facebook, is up in arms about it —
apparently such that Apple might delay enforcing it for a few more
months, according to this report today by Alex Heath for The
Information (paywalled, alas — here’s MacRumors’s summary).
Heath's report closes thus:

Branch CEO Alex Austin, whose company specializes in
measuring the effectiveness of ads in mobile apps, called
Apple's proposed change to IDFA “unworkable for the app
ecosystem.”

“Apple’s move has gone too far, disproportionately
disrupting a vibrant app ecosystem by throwing the baby
out with the bathwater,” he told The Information.

The entitlement of these fuckers is just off the charts. They have zero
right, none, to the tracking they've been getting away with. We, as a
society, have implicitly accepted it because we never really noticed it.
You, the user, have no way of seeing it happen. Our brains are
naturally attuned to detect and viscerally reject, with outrage and
alarm, real-world intrusions into our privacy. Real-world marketers

could never get away with tracking us like online marketers do.

The Fediverse doesn't have any privacy either and now they can cut down on some of server costs because we are doing the hosting ourselves. To be indie. Uh, not sure where I'm going with this train of thought.

@Sandra @kensanata sharing things publicly is a true choice to give up privacy; that's different than the intrusive tracking across the web and into the real world that large tech/media/ad companies do

My fedi host isn't tracking me outside what it needs to do to function, and it's clear about what that is

Is it perfect? No. Is it massively better than Facebook/Twitter/Google/etc? Yes. Utopian fallacies are hostile to progress

@calcifer @kensanata I wasn’t saying that the Fedi hosts were tracking you; just that a spider bot could.

@Sandra @kensanata I understood. I'm saying that indexing posts you make in public is an extremely different scale of privacy risk than the kind of tracking that ad/tech/social companies do.

On fedi, the tracking is limited to what you share on fedi unless your host is malicious/compromised. You know exactly what it's possible to track, and you can exercise control of it fairly easily: your posts and your profile and your fedi network. Mainstream networks track a huge percentage of your activity even away from those networks, even if you don't have an account, and it's not always possible to know what they know about you

It's "nosy neighbors" vs "secret police" levels of privacy risk.

OCR Output (chars: 1199) 

@resynth1943
Consider the new ad-tracking privacy protection feature in iOS 14.
The tracking industry, led by Facebook, is up in arms about it —
apparently such that Apple might delay enforcing it for a few more
months, according to this report today by Alex Heath for The
Information (paywalled, alas — here’s MacRumors’s summary).
Heath's report closes thus:

Branch CEO Alex Austin, whose company specializes in
measuring the effectiveness of ads in mobile apps, called
Apple's proposed change to IDFA “unworkable for the app
ecosystem.”

“Apple’s move has gone too far, disproportionately
disrupting a vibrant app ecosystem by throwing the baby
out with the bathwater,” he told The Information.

The entitlement of these fuckers is just off the charts. They have zero
right, none, to the tracking they've been getting away with. We, as a
society, have implicitly accepted it because we never really noticed it.
You, the user, have no way of seeing it happen. Our brains are
naturally attuned to detect and viscerally reject, with outrage and
alarm, real-world intrusions into our privacy. Real-world marketers

could never get away with tracking us like online marketers do.

@markosaric stab that baby agamemnon in the bath before throwing the whole bloody mess out

@markosaric
> Or imagine if you found out that public billboards were taking photos of people who glance at them

Eh dutch railways (NS) billboards had/have cameras in them that are checking if you're looking tweakers.net/nieuws/129181/ap- using this quividi.com/products-services/ wikipedia lists some other organizations doing similar en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audience

Looks like it's _basically_ pretty limited in the Netherlands tweakers.net/nieuws/140231/ap-

@jasper @markosaric I wouldn’t be surprised if more of the “hypothetical” real-world facial recognition based marketing wasn’t already going on but, just like with app tracking, we don’t know it because we can’t see it.

@markosaric The post is really great but they should show how to handle privacy correctly by removing Google Analytics from the page #DeleteGoogle #FuckOffGoogle

@markosaric real world marketers do track us like online marketing does.

try buying anything without visa or mastercard.

@markosaric I think this might be sort of related to your question, @ataraxia937 .

One thing I don't understand is why web browsers still default to accepting third-party cookies. The reliance of the tracking industry on third-party cookies is tremendous, so much better privacy is literally one sane default away.

@markosaric He's totally wrong about real life marketers', they do invade our privacy (e.g. tracking people with bluetooth/WiFi, ibeacons, whatever wireless crap, to locate them inside buildings/at train stations… ). Either most people are not avare, or they just don't give a flying fuck…

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Fosstodon

Fosstodon is an English speaking Mastodon instance that is open to anyone who is interested in technology; particularly free & open source software.