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I’m seeing lots of posts today about how is tracking Android users via the SDK.

Is this really a shock to people? Like, really? This is Facebook we’re talking about here.

The answer is simple...delete your account.

And yes, I know it tracks even if you don’t have an account. So use a VPN, or don’t use that app.

Even if you don’t though, by not having a FB account you significantly reduce the amount of data they have on you anyway.

@kev I'm not sure using a VPN is relevant here.

Also, people don't know what an SDK is, why should apps with no apparent connection to facebook have facebook's code within it?

The only way to be truly safe is to use **only** free software.

@Matter a VPN will change your public IP address, which makes tracking much more difficult. Especially if it’s a popular vpn service.

It’s widely known that any site with a FB like button beacons home. I’m not surprised to hear that the fb login button does the same.

@Matter @kev It's insane to run any app on Android today without some kind of firewall (Blokada, DNS66, AFWall maybe, but it's app-wide). I don't even trust Free Software anymore because most devs don't really care and include proprietary blobs or tracking libraries and I don't have time nor resources to audit code of every single app that I use.

@mgl @kev F-droid doesn't allow proprietary blobs, so apps distributed on there are probably fine (and anti-features are marked clearly)

@avndp @kev i really dont like brave.

if you *really* care about privacy and like the modern web, firefox is (unfortunately) the best way to go.

brave is overhyped, fed by buzzwords, and underdelivers.

@twee @kev I'm ready to convince, but I do not understand why firefox is better and why brave is overhyped. Can you clarify further?

@avndp @kev for a start, brave replaces ads with its own ads. parasite?

its based on chromium, so also gets chromiums bugs (this is the case for any browser and its engine), in this regard is no better than chrome.

also, the basic attention token. its built on ethereum. i personally have doubts about anything that talks about the blockchain, but i feel the whole thing is more beneficial to brave company, and no better/worse than firefox for websites.

@twee
Replaces with its own ads. Yes but with no trackers and anonymous model. BAT is right now based on Ethereum , in future may be it'll have its own chain? Product develops.
@kev

@twee
Brave is based in chromium but a separate product with active developments. The advantage of open source is that even though chromium have some bugs, brave can fix them first or vice versa.
@kev

@avndp @kev yes the brave people may fix chromium bugs, as my google. but that does not mean that they do not exist. my point was that brave is not a new browser engine, but a new interface.

@twee
What attracted me towards brave is that it's giving more to the publishers, breaking the existing google's one side ad network and building a decentralized, block chain based ad network with BAT. Of course, brave company will benefit from this, what's wrong? Anything that betters the existing situation is obviously a supportable thing. In the case of brave publishers , advertisers and end users are getting benefited and user will get rid of unnecessary popups and trackers.
@kev

@avndp @kev google wasnt the only ad network. yes, most of them were bad. but do you really think that replacing them with a monopoly is better, even a self-proclaimed benevolent monopoly?

being a blockchain means nothing. ethereum is used for a lot of situations it is not necessary for. it is a marketing tool.

not to mention the lack of explanation as to how the money gets to the creators.

firefox does the same and is (more) honest about its goals.

@twee @kev obviously firefox is a Not for profit organization and will be more clear on its policies.

I don't think there is too much monopoly. Brave multiple times quoted that 70% revenue will be for publishers. Adblocker is at any time not correct. Brave is generating revenue or in their words fixing the web by introducing anonymous ad system that is mutually beneficial for both publishers and advertisers without compromising in the end user content standards.

@avndp @kev if every ad you see is provided by brave, thats a monopoly.

@avndp @kev i use firefox, as well as liberapay/flattr/paypal for sites i like.

@twee @avndp @kev

And don't forget the recent controversy with BAT. (tild.es/9b0). They told users to support people with BAT token, even when the creators people were "supporting" didn't enroll to the BAT system and Brave didn't let them know they received donations. Oh, and Brave gets the donations when they are unclaimed for one month, how convenient! twitter.com/tomscott/status/10
(To be fair, they now show (almost invisible) warning that people you are supporting are not enrolled).

@kev I deleted my FB last Spring. Never looked back. I don't even miss it a little. It's been lifechanging for me to get away from FB and EVERYONE on it. Hard to say that about so many old friends, but I gave them other options to keep in touch. Out of 500+ people only a handful even bothered. So that what FB really is for all of us, a lot of fake friends who will voice their 2 cents on anything in your life, but not care even 1 bit about you.

@kev @lee8oi for some. For others, privacy issues aside, it's a pleasant experience. Same goes for twitter or any social network.

@rpcutts you’re literally the first person I’ve ever hear says that!

@lee8oi

@kev @lee8oi in that case I think people need to get better friends.

@rpcutts But keep in mind, when you have so many of those people familiar with your profile, just simply moving on is not as simple of a task. Especially when people create new accounts trying to get around blocks n stuff. In the end some people do have to truly decide to part ways with the network.

@rpcutts @kev It's a pleasant experience when you meet new people and fill your streams up with interesting things. But when you focus on people you know personally rather than by interest, you get quite a mess after a while. Especially if the association only happened to boost the profile or something.

@lee8oi
One positive is being surrounded by like minded people, that's a relief.
@rpcutts @kev

@LPS @lee8oi @kev my Facebook feed is just friends and family minus anyone I find annoying.

@rpcutts @LPS @kev Mine was too in the end. Yet out of all of them, still only a fraction really cared about the same things I did or even really cared about me aside from expecting my presence in their feeds. But I'm certainly not intending to take a position that nobody can be happy on Facebook. I'm just simply stating what I've learned from years of being on it.

@lee8oi indeed. People often do what they think is expected of them rather than what is good for them.

@kev Never had a Facebook account so I don't care much about the "normal" tracking they do there, but l really don't like the tracking of random other people via buttons, yeah. The correlation they can do with data from WhatsApp, Oculus, Instagram and whatever else they own doesn't inspire confidence either, let alone the bazillion of recent scandals. Anyway, I consider it a good thing personally to at least raise awareness of what they do, especially among non-techy folks.

@kev Using VPN doesn't help, as tracking uses ad token that is stored permanently. You can delete the token, but new one will be issued to you - and you have the same problem again. And deleting the token is inconvenient just enough to make you not do it often enough. There is no way to win this fight (well, you can use pihole or filter traffic if you root your phone - but there is no way to win for even moderately tech-aware people).

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