Changed my profile picture to something that fits me better.

julius boosted

@johnfocker

AnkiDroid is indispensible. Helps you fill the little moments with studying. Start by learning to read hiragana and katakana, should only take a couple of weeks. Then learn a few hundred kanji, in RTK order, then start studying vocabulary instead of abstract kanji (or keep studying abstract kanji if it interests you, but start vocab too). Use Tae Kim's grammar guide to start getting a grip on the grammar. It may be helpful to use Anki to study vocab specifically for Tae Kim. Once you start feeling like you can hold basic conversations, get a 1:1 tutor on Italki and work on improving your conversational skills. Then seek out IRL native speakers and befriend them (tip: they'll want to practice english with you, too, my friends and I have been known to use an egg timer and switch languages every 5 minutes).

Break down your studies into each constituent part and adjust your approach as you go to cater to what's working for you and what's not. You should have a separate study plan for developing your kanji, vocab, grammar, reading, writing, and conversation skills.

Best of luck!

I now officially run

This was kind of an ordeal. Gonna try and figure out what I actually did and then automate the process somewhat eventually.

A lot of *nix tools used to have no man pages, huh?

Fedora has less packages than Debian but I like that it is backed by Red Hat. Apart from advantages the distro might receive from such an arrangement, I might wanna work with their products professionally at some point.

Gentoo just seems like the distro I could learn the most from. I would need to decide how to configure it, if I did not just choose the "default" choice every time. Maybe I'll write a script to configure it for me, once I figured stuff out. (2/2)

I'm considering to distrohop again or at least test a distro I haven't dealt with extensively before. The options which interest me the most right now are Debian, Fedora and Gentoo.

Debian is nice because of the massive package repositories. It seems like the most convenient distro if I just want to be sure I get everything I need on it. But maybe I don't want convenience, if I wanna learn more about Linux and deal with some of the problems myself. (1/?)

Considering to buy 7 Billion Humans to learn about parallelism and concurrency. Also, that sentence sounds weird if you don't know it's a game.

roadmap.sh/devops
What I'm going for right now. I should definitely learn more about networking and set something up.

Installing (or still installing one) two OpenStack virtual labs on my laptop. Not sure what to do with them yet, just trying out stuff.

Aside from learning Docker, I'm also reading Working Effectively with Legacy Code by Michael C. Feathers. Not sure I'm getting much out of it. There are concepts in there that sound useful but I lack the experience in actual software development to actually use them. And I guess I don't have a legacy project to deal with. Maybe it's more useful as a guide through some actual problems, instead reading from back to back, as I do right now.

Changed my name to the docker mascot because I wanna learn more about docker and it's cute. Might change my avatar more often now and I'll try to post more.

I actually made some commits to Pleroma just now. Just fixed some of the docs.

Okay, upgrading broke it. Guess I'll be using the outdated version.

I wanted some code in my profile picture, now it's an anime character from a game with the word "code" in the title.

Is it normal that I get anime pics when I google "code"?

Testing out Vagrant and then upgrading the test VM that I'm not gonna use much anymore anyway. That's just me.

Reading about network security because those are two areas I wanna know more about.

Show more
Fosstodon

Fosstodon is an English speaking Mastodon instance that is open to anyone who is interested in technology; particularly free & open source software.