I've *basically* turned 's web client into a webapp version of . I've got all the UI hidden and use it 99% with keyboard commands.

It's not for everyone, but I'm really enjoying it—and I love that their custom CSS is flexible enough to let me do so.

Anyone else both use Proton Mail and crazy enough to want this? I'm trying to decide if I should throw it up on Git.

(or is it ?)

I recently switched up my window manager and default color scheme—and I'm pretty happy with how minimalist it turned out.

You can also check out my blog post with more screenshots, including an example of how I use this setup to toot from .

codesections.com/blog/sunday-s

I've been messing around with more (stumpwm.github.io/) and really like it.

I've got to say, this is the first time I've genuinely had the "read the source, Luke" feeling. Maybe it's a sign of the documentation having a few holes, but the source code is so clean and readable that I'm ending up understanding how it works from the code more than the docs. Cf. blog.codinghorror.com/learn-to

(And that's even true comparing it to dwm/other Suckless projects, which have very clean code)

Which of these is a "horizontal split" and which is a "vertical split"? And why?

(I've noticed that different programs flip the terminology—what do *you* think?)

Does anyone else find themselves needing to take timestamped notes in ? I wrote a quick bit of vimscript to make it easier/automatic to do so and I'm happy to throw it up in a gist or something if there's any interest. Here's what it looks like:

Turns out, all this time I was supposed to be getting colored output from 's `cargo test` command—but I wasn't because I had my $TERM set to the wrong value. Oops!

I keep a plaintext list of links I want to read soon, and just started managing it with my new CLI app, mnemonic (github.com/codesections/mnemon) and I just now had the experience of pushing a new link to that with the `mn edit -p` command—and it felt great!

Sometime the best part of writing software is that it give me *exactly* the workflow I want!

v0.2.0 of my CLI app, mnemonic, is now up. I significantly refactored the UI to use sub-commands instead of flags/options for the basic commands, which makes the whole UI a bit more ergonomic. For example, you can now run `mn rm -f notes` to delete the mnemonic named 'notes' without a confirmation dialogue.

This version also adds command-line flags to specify the syntax highlighting language and to output plaintext instead of highlighted text if you prefer.

github.com/codesections/mnemon

Just released a new : mnemonic (aka `mn`), the CLI app for remembering those little things that slip your mind.

Coded with <3 in .

Code here: github.com/codesections/mnemon

r/rust discussion here: reddit.com/r/rust/comments/aj2

Screencast below:

See below for actual clip of the dlarm (dwm-alarm) going off visually.

Slightly put off by the third link—which is a live link to the page the user is *currently on*. Why do websites ever do that? Do they think I'm going to print their site? But they don't even have a url, so that wouldn't work …

Just as a counterpart to all the examples @GDPRHallOfShame has been posting, here is what an opt out option *should* look like. One prominent button to entirely opt out. Nice job Open Knowledge International! blog.okfn.org/2018/10/25/open-

I have been having a incredibly odd issue where my nvim background color suddenly decided to stop working inside tmux even though I didn't change anything in either program's config file.

The image below shows what it *should* look like on the right and what it *actually* looks like on the left. The Internet is full of advice about how to solve a _similar_ problem, but none of those solutions seem to apply. This just might drive me insane.

Have y'all tried out `exa`? It's a recent `ls` replacement that adds colorized output and git-status indicators without sacrificing speed or simplicity. I just installed it, and I'm pretty happy so far. the.exa.website/

Before and after screenshot below:

As @kev said, I put together a local-timeline viewer for . hub.fosstodon.org/timeline-pre

Here are the technical details, in case you're curious: Like my t5 and mastodon-de-mob projects, localTimeline is an exercise in minimalism: it loads < 9KB of data before making http requests to fosstodon.org.

But it trades one form of minimalism for another: my past apps were pure native JavaScript, without dependencies. This app uses Preact, which lets it have simple, modular code like this:

Just discovered s-tui, a great terminal app for measuring CPU performance/temperature/throttling. github.com/amanusk/s-tui

It's really cool and full of useful insights! For example, I discovered that my laptop isn't hitting any more than 3.0 GHz, even though it's rated for 4.0.

Related: any tips on fixing that?

I'm currently debugging some issues with my Raspberry Pi, and I'm hovering somewhere between steps two and three of the xkcd shark attack sequence. xkcd.com/349/

If you don't hear from me after this, assume it ended in sharks.

My experience when writing HTML just got a lot more pleasant (and colorful) thanks to a plugin: github.com/luochen1990/rainbow. It color-codes matching opening and closing HTML tags (and matching parentheses/brackets)in code. This makes it *much* easier to avoid miss-indenting code—one of those errors that can really drive you crazy.

H/T @sjl whose classic post, Coming Home To Vim, stevelosh.com/blog/2010/09/com mentions a similar plugin (I'd forgotten until I re-read the post, which I recommend)

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