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Stats from my last open source contribution:

lines added: 79
lined deleted: 82
lines in commit msg: 870

I can't decide if I'm doing software development really _wrong_, or really _right_.

@codesections I guess unless it's Perl. In which case you probably just made it less readable.

@codesections don't take my Perl hate personally. I've just had two bad experiences with perl and swore never to open a .pl file again.

@rune

:) Not taken personally at all.

Also, I should probably repeat my previous toot with better capitalization:

well, it's Not Quite Perl, mostly (github.com/Raku/nqp)

@codesections yeah I figured it was raku 😉

Truth be told I'm vastly under qualified to say anything about perl or derivatives. I probably just got some really bad code.

@codesections I've definitely written paragraphs to describe two lines of code. I've even started entire flame wars over changing one character in a line of code, preceded by buckets of words justifying said change.

It's times like that that I reflect on the nature of the "line" in our collective "lines of code" metrics.

@paul

> I've even started entire flame wars over changing one character in a line of code, preceded by buckets of words justifying said change.

care to share the story behind that one?

@codesections basically I made a PR in an open source project correcting a decade-old mistake. In a giant commit of changes, someone had accidentally set a range to be -1-1, when it was supposed to be 0-1 (as seen in the commit before). This mistake went unnoticed until I found it again.

Problem is, this was in a pretty core part of the codebase, so reverting it back to the correct range would trigger a huge cascade of changes. So, they insisted keeping in the mistake in the name of backwards compatibility because it had been in there so long.

@codesections Reaaally right IMHO, even if it's just for the lines in commit messages.

Many a repo I browse online has commit messages that are only a slight imprevement over the hash of the commit itself. Personally I stick to detailed commit messages even in my dotfiles and esp. for less important changes because that's just the kind of thing you'll forget why you did the day after.

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