There are no cities older than a few hundred years in the US. Rarely do you see a building that's more than 100 years old.

I wonder what that does for our mentality towards the past, vs places where there are buildings that are literally 1000 years old and older?

Follow

@ajroach42

> There are no cities older than a few hundred years in the US. Rarely do you see a building that's more than 100 years old. I wonder what that does for our mentality towards the past, vs places where there are buildings that are literally 1000 years old and older?

"America is a place where they think 100 years is a long time. Europe is a place where they think 100 miles is a long way"
– old joke

America ? You mean United States, the whole continent or Northern America ?

🙄

@codesections @ajroach42

@dada @codesections Both, really.

South America ha some structures that are older, but they are pretty rare there too.

@ajroach42 I was just joking about the use of "America" as if the United States were the only country of this continent.
The US have a really recent story but the whole continent is older than being old. I think the house I grew in is older than the US :p

@codesections

@dada @ajroach42

> I think the house I grew in is older than the US :p

Yeah, and this is *heavily* dependent on the region. For example, both the southern US and California have very few buildings older 100 years, but the north east US has considerably more.

I'm not knowledgeable enough about North American regions outside the US to know how they'd compare, but I'm sure it also varies.

@codesections @ajroach42 I've been on a guided city tour through New York, and they are _really_ proud of their history. I mentioned that the city hall in my hometown is about three times as old. They stared at me like that was before time was invented.

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Fosstodon

Fosstodon is an English speaking Mastodon instance that is open to anyone who is interested in technology; particularly free & open source software.