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Have any of y'all used (or the variety)? How is it?

I hadn't come across it before, but it sounds… intriguing

@codesections a few of the applications I run use postgres. With my *very* limited experience, it's not much different from MySQL. It has some nice "shortcuts" for various commands that display a better manner but, other than that, ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Mastodon, Plume, Gitea, and phpLists, use postgres. Everything else is on MariaDB.

@amolith

Thanks, but that wasn't really what I was asking.

I'm familiar with versus other and databases. What I was asking about was *pl*pgSQL (or plSQL) the *procedural programming language* bundled with different SQL databases.

I knew they had their own query languages, obviously, but I had no idea they had procedural languages too, and I'm curious if anyone knows what it's like to write code in those languages

@codesections @amolith I have on Oracle. I don't recommend it. There are sometimes good performance reasons to do it, but as someone else said, it is not a very expressive language, and it also can create maintenance problems by splitting up your codebase.

@gcupc

As @codesections says, it is not the most expressive thing in the world but it's mostly intended for stored procedures to be used in triggers and such, and it's usually sufficient for that.

However, #pgsql is only one of the available procedural languages in #Postgresql. If it doesn't fulfill your needs (or can't be arsed to learn it) others are available or you can write your own.

Chapter 42 of the Postgres manual has all the info. pgsql itself takes about half a day to learn.

@codesections . . . . Oh :blob_grinning_sweat:

Yeah I have no experience with that 😂

@codesections I've written a few things in PL/pgSQL. Being able to write code in the database is really convenient for certain tasks (especially things like updating caches), but as a language it's not super expressive and it's not very easy to organize large amounts of code. It's great when used with moderation.

@ayo

> I've written a few things in PL/pgSQL. Being able to write code in the database is really convenient for certain tasks (especially things like updating caches), but as a language it's not super expressive and it's not very easy to organize large amounts of code. It's great when used with moderation.

That was my first thought too. So, in your view, it's probably not a *great* sign for a large-ish project to have been written primarily in PL/pgSQL? github.com/evergreen-library-s

@codesections It might be possible to do it well, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice for a large project.

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