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Tell me about your backup solution

@arran I usually look over my right shoulder with my head at a 90 degree angle.

@arran copying files to a air-gapped computer, encrypting them, then moving them to an encrypted hard drive (which is also air-gapped). Placing the hard drive in a secure place with multiple layers of non-digital security.

@arran everytime there's new data that should be kept.

@arran I use timeshift. At some point, I want to schedule a cron job to replicate my /timeshift/* backups to a separate drive or even to the cloud.

@unicornfarts Oh hadn't heard of this, does it have support for encrypted backups?

@arran technically yes, if timeshift is configured to backup data to an encrypted partition that is already unlocked. Timeshift also isn't ideal for backup of user data, and doesn't by default. It's primary function is making snapshots of the system directories.

This forum post might help you decide if timeshift is something you want to setup or not:
forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic

@unicornfarts Cheers! I didn't really consider doing system snapshots until now

@arran I think system snapshots are good in addition to other backups. If I mess a configuration up or bork my php environment for example, I can quickly roll back to before I changed anything and not have to worry about any lengthy restore from backup tasks.

@arran I'm using Synology NAS, configured for off-site encrypted backups to Icedrive.io (1 TB lifetime plan).

It's all very easy to setup, but the downside would be the initial investment. It's worth the peace of mind for me + you can self-host whatever on Syno via Docker (or their own packages).

@allien Thanks for your input!

Although I can't find their pricing without signing up...

@arran icedrive.net/plans
$149 for 1 TB, with 2 TB bandwidth. Fun fact: if you connect via webdav, they don't count it :)

@allien Cheers! No idea how they can pull off lifetime plans haha

@arran oh yes, it's a bit of risk indeed. Who knows if they can actually pull it off..

@arran well and there it goes.. IceDrive is dropping WebDAV support, which was the only way of connecting to them from my NAS.

I hope you went with some other option in the end, I don't wanna see pitchforks :)

@allien Oh guttered!

I ended up going with a storage KVM from Nexus Bytes and using Borg Backup.

nexusbytes.com/kvm-storage-vps

@arran Solutions - plural, for different concerns:

1) Rsync with crosslinks of /home, /etc, /usr/local to a normally offline hard disk on my desk to guard against accidental file deletions.

2) hg push to netbook in kitchen and, for a few things to RPi in office, to guard against disk failures.

3) Tar/gpg to 32GB USB stick on my keyring of main projects to guard against house fire or burglary.

4) dd to 1 of 2 hard drives, one of which is always offsite to guard against major disaster.

@arran PS: all disks are LUKS encrypted.

The only exception is the SD card in the RPi as I want that to boot unattended so I only copy stuff to it which is public anyway, like the source of my website.

@edavies Pretty solid setup! Thanks for the insight

@arran Encrypted backup using Deja
Dup to Google Drive (ugh I know but its cheap and convenient but also encrypted). And local backup to external using back in time. Hopefully getting a friend and I setup to do cronjob remote backups via duplicity to each other in the future.

@ndanes I've considered the latter too, having trouble getting duplicity setup though :ac_sigh:

@arran

I use Back In Time to backup data as well as a manual copy/paste for small stuff. I use Timeshift for system settings. I also take clone images using Redo Backup. I do the Back in Time daily; the copy/paste weekly and the images every few months or after major changes. Soon I will be investing in a fire proof safe to keep tbe drives in that I backup to.

@arran

Daily rsnapshot on encrypted Linux Box

Linux box rsnapshoted on remote box

Simple and effective

@arran Time machine, occasionally (very) duplicated and stored off-site.

@arran
An array of over 3000 3.5" floppy disks in Raid 0 hooked up to a Commodore 64

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