I've been using picocom for a USB-to-UART serial terminal client for a long time, but now I need something I can set an inter-character/byte delay on. minicom is unnecessarily complex, but technically can do the job.
Some digging later, I stumbled on tio. Definitely a new favorite, it's an even lighter picocom but with an output delay option.

While it's ridiculous that it was necessary, this is what a "well regulated malitia" would look like in the modern day.
Texas should take notes from their southern neighbors.

euronews.com/2021/04/13/mexica

Aaravchen :linux: :suspicious: boosted

I guess Microsoft banked on Google winning over Oracle.

Within days of Google's win against Oracle in the lawsuit over whether the Java API itself is patentable, Microsoft revealed they've been working for 18 months on their own Java VM variant (an OpenJDK branch).

devblogs.microsoft.com/java/an

Not interesting for what it says, but the implications. At least one U.S Supreme Court Justice publicly acknowledging that social media is an antitrust/monopoly.

npr.org/2021/04/05/984440891/j

I'm working on a device system design where some of the top OS contenders are customized variants of Fedora CoreOS/Silverblue/IoT and OpenSUSE MicroOS because of their near deterministic system state after an upgrade because of OSTree. I'm aware of Nix(OS), but the primary workloads are going to be pre-vetted containers and NIX seems like an alternative to containers and poorly suited to them.

Anyone have feedback, alternatives, or things to watch out for?

A perfect example of how a free market doesn't work for everything, especially when it's a basic human need.

Why Texas's power grid died.
reuters.com/article/us-usa-wea

Apparently the answer to Google and Facebook being advertising and social media monopolies is to let news agencies come together to form a negotiating monopoly. Just ignore the antitrust subcommittee saying antitrust enforcement is the real answer (end of article).

reuters.com/article/us-austral

@session
On security, the reasoning is PoS protects against large scale malicious actors b/c it requires exponentially increasing investment for majority share, then attacking burns the investment so it's against self-interest. However that assumes the only attack benefits are financial from coins gained. Doesn't adding services like Session on top of it mean you are adding majority share benefits like msg intercept to justify the investment loss and actively undermining the security?

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I took another look at @session after initially discounting it from a cursory look and seeing "Session protocol" (e.g. unique protocol) and "security analysis in progress" on the website. Only after a deeper dive did I discover it has a long running PoS block chain for servers running a Tor-like onion routing for the messaging and that's why it says "Session protocol" and "security analysis in progress".

Recently tried Manyverse again, and while it's come a long way, it seems to be having lots of problems with direction. Offline fully p2p social network = cool. SSB protocol having systemic unsolved design issues with majority disconnected clients (needs PubServers for replication) and user bootstrapping (how do you get followed if you can only be seen when followed?).

TIL to shuck oysters. By trial and error using a screwdriver. It's fun, but I understand now why shucking knives are shaped the way they are.

I was just recently forced to return to a Windows laptop for some programming activity after a long period on Linux. When did Windows start breaking touchpad functionality with impunity?

My Synaptic non-precision touchpad is registering a three finger click as the Cortana action (despite being disabled) even though the driver has it set to middle-click as is standard for all laptops for the last 10 years.

What has been happening while I was gone?

Aaravchen :linux: :suspicious: boosted

Surprised by incredibly out of date technology are we? I'm getting to be more of a proponent of the proposal that Congress people have to fix their own WiFi before they're allowed to vote on any technology bills.

Senators were wowed by 1-hour photo processing during the Inauguration Ceremony as if it were 'modern technology' or hasn't been in use by Six Flags for decades.

cnet.com/news/during-inaugurat

Ah, I seem to have confused the terms. "Zen Mode" is the OnePlus rebrand of the Android feature "Digital Wellbeing". They're functionality identical, but Android promotes it under the latter name and the update list for Android 11 and (partial list) for Android 12 are almost exclusively focused on "Digital Wellbeing" updates.

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Android Zen Mode is supposed to be a "hot new feature in Android 11 and 12".
I've looked into it and find no possible use case for it other than a parent controlling a child's phone. Maybe I'm missing a trend.

Do you use Android Zen Mode or equivalent?

Way to show your true antitrust activities by blocking privacy involvement in browser standards to protect your advertising business Google.

Google is the sole vetoing vote in a 24-to-1 failure to ratify the ability for the Privacy Interest Group to veto W3C motions for just cause.
cpomagazine.com/data-privacy/g

TIL Helen's Law.
"Don't attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity"

Not sure how I made it this long without hearing it before.

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